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a tremendous amount of damage. terror attacks such as 9/11, oklahoma city, in this case hurricanes -- and we've had a number of those. katrina stands in our minds, but irene and on and on it goes -- sandy being the latest. and this one was truly of monumental proportion and create add lot of damage. and, therefore, a federal response is needed and necessary, if we're going to begin to have an adequate recovery, get people back too work and back in their homes, businesses up and growing again and working. and the bill that is currently on the floor for us here attem attempts to do that. now, some of us were somewhat staggered by the initial number, $60.4 billion. that may not be enough. that may be too much. but in the short amount of time that we've had to try to put all the estimates together in terms of what might be needed, what we have -- senate republican appropriations members attempted to do is separate that from what is immediately needed -- immediate laid being from the time of the storm through march 27 -- to attend to those first responders, those initial responses that need to ta
this city was unacceptable to him, and he made that clear to all of us. danny's focus was on people, on the infrastructure that they depend on in their communities, on the most vulnerable, on our military families, and on the state of hawaii. mr. president, if danny inouye was a giant here in the senate, he was a mountain back home. hawaii would not be hawaii without danny inouye. he fought for his state. he would not allow it to be ignored, and he made it a better place to live and work for george bush reagan administrations to come. -- for generations to come. mr. president, as a senator from another state far from washington, d.c., i learned a lot from senator inouye about how to advocate for the people who elect you and how to make sure they never get lost here in the mix. through his quiet and shining example, we all earn willed a bit -- we all learned a bit more about bipartisan. i so remember danny huddling on the floor working closely with his good friend, senator stevens from alaska. we all learned a bit more about effectiveness. he knew how to get things done. we all learn
, setting his city on a remarkable path of economic growth and prosperity as well as efficiency. as mayor, he served three terms on the u.s. advisory commission on intergovernmental relations and as president of the national league of cities. it is he have dent as i tell you -- it is evident, as i tell you this, mr. president, that dick lugar always rises to the top of any organization because his colleagues recognize his extraordinary capability and his outstanding leadership. dick's life experiences and characteristic have served the people of indiana and of our country so well. he has been "the" leader in reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. what better tribute? what better legacy could anyone leave the world than to reduce the inventory of these dangerous weapons? the bipartisan partnership he forged in 1991 to destroy these weapons of mass destruction in the former soviet union has resulted in the deactivation of more than 7,500 nuclear warheads that once were aimed at the united states. as chairman of the agriculture committee, dick lugar has led the way
a number of times, the president himself in the city and has talked about it. along the lines would've talked about today. could work with republicans and democrats in congress to get that done. so again i appreciate what folks have done already in the panel behind me. many of them, at some risk, put out their ideas of where we opt ago. i plan to take a little more time this morning, but the time is put in a little bit. i'm going to come at this point, take it back to maya and look forward to hearing from gene and hearing from gene anthem so my constituents on some of the tough issues we will face as we move forward on this incredibly important short-term project. keep from going over the cliff which we must avoid, but also in the process of doing that, established the framework, two things i think have to be part of it, entitlement reform and tax reform. thank you all. [applause] >> thank you so much, senator. next we're going to hear from gene sperling who's the head of the national economic council of the white house. obvious enemies of a lot of discussions that are going on righ
would happen if a nuclear explosion went off in new york city so everything has to be done to prevent it it's a breeding ground for the terrorists and they do it, and as time goes on, they become more technically capable which in the past has been one of the stumbling blocks when we worked on this in the task force there were not many that could even think about building a nuclear weapon. that unfortunately is changing. >> julia was giving me the death stair which means that our time is up. i want to tell you that after you are working is happening with the hands of such experts please give them a round of applause. [applause] more now on how the budget price of the sequestration could affect the defense spending and national security. from washington journal, this is a little more than an hour. >> we are back. our conversation continues. gordon adams is the white house associate budget director for national security served from 1993 to 1997, and vice president of lexington institute here to give their perspective on sequestration and the impact on the pentagon. let's begin. what affe
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6